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    Brinly plow

    I’m pretty sure I saw Brinly in the Allied Equipment Catalog, so I’ll post this here. Picked this plow up 2 years ago. I couldn’t see the picture in the ad real well, and the lady had no idea what it was. It was pretty rough, but a 3 point Brinly for $50 with the coulter and depth wheel I figured was a good deal. Took it apart and a friend knew a guy that powder coated, it was cheap but he didn’t do much prep to it, it’s still rough from the heavy rust. And the white is more white vs the Cub white I wanted but oh well. I got it adjusted and used it. Works good, but I think a 10” would do better.
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    Rich

    #2
    Man and I thought I just did good on a Brinly adapter and a moldboard plow for $75!

    that looks great yetter and fantastic deal for what you got wow. I think I’m more impressed that you ran with chains weights and turfs and pulled through that soup on the side without getting stuck great job!

    Comment


      #3
      Well that soup was not there when I did it, initially. I wanted to finish up today but it has rained the past 3 days so when I got over to it, no go. I’d like to plow the rest before winter but I may not be able to.
      I have the tires filled, a 75 pound weight on the left side only and chains. It did ok, spun a few times but I’ll blame myself, trying to set it up and yada yada.
      Rich

      Comment


        #4
        You got a really good deal there Rich! It does take a lot to pull a 12" plow, but I don't think a 10 would do better.

        Hey, seriously, you shouldn't plow when it's that wet. Although, when plowing it does do best when the soil is "heavy".... but not mud. You can create more problems by working the ground too wet. The dirt will dry in clumps leaving clods that are hard to break up. Working soil too wet also compacts it. It will actually compact it bad enough just doing it one time that it will take several years to get it broken up again. What happens is it packs it tighter when it's wet, then plant roots can't penetrate it, and water can't absorb into it. I remember you tiller your garden pretty wet this last spring, so you really need to hear this. Even using the tiller after it dries will make it appear OK, but it's only an appearance. You really should avoid working soil that is too wet.

        Since you already worked it, I would suggest going out and broadcasting some winter wheat on it. It's late enough that it will likely come up, but wont' get too tall before you have to till it under in the spring. Just toss it out there by hand. That will add organic material to the soil, which aids in building a good seedbed, but will also help loosen up the soil over winter and maybe shorten the damage.

        Overall, it looks like you did a good job. From what I see, depth was about right, and you layed it out right. Nice rollover, and all the sod was turned under. Good job on that!
        ~Jonathan
        Oblong, Illinois

        Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

        I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

        Comment


          #5
          Thanks for the input Jon. I will get some winter wheat and put on it.
          I’ll try not to derail this too much but I should give some back story on this area, maybe I can get some more help with it. This piece of ground isn’t mine, it’s part of an old farm my neighbor owns. In those pictures, probably 25 yards to the left is a creek. About 50 yards or so to the right starts up to the top of a ridge. From what the owner told me this area was never farmed but was cut for hay.

          It was late this spring when I got around to planting, and since there was already grass there I never got it started correctly. I know it should’ve been plowed first but it wasn’t ready to go, so that’s why I tilled first, which I’m sure just multiplied the weeds.

          Green and wax beans did well, potatoes were kind of a flop. Of course all the rain we had this summer hindered things too. It seemed like it would rain for 3 days then a day or so of sun! Then weeds would take off like wildfire. Add to that the first year or two of a garden is tough going to begin with. I need to get some better drainage on the left (low) side towards that creek for sure.

          As as far as setup on the plow, I found the Brinly manual online and got it adjusted per that. Which was pretty close to the witness marks already in the frame. I think the 12” was geared more towards the supers with the bigger tires, but I was surprised how easily it did pull when it was setup correctly.

          And if this needs moved, please do! Maybe a sticky on what not to do! Lol!
          Rich

          Comment


            #6
            Weeds grow. That's a fact of life obviously, but there are somethings that cause them. Certain types of weeds like certain types of soil. You can tell a lot about the soil type from the weeds. Identify them if you can, and them you can study up on what makes them grow. That said, weeds all like compacted soil. Some types more than others.... but that's another reason you don't want to till when it's too wet. It makes the weed pressure greater.

            As far as the plow, the size of tires are only relevant to the tractor, and needed traction. The bigger the tire, does not necessarily make for better traction. I don't care what anyone tells you, the widest tire you want for plowing is an 8.50. With a 12" plow, a 10.50 should work, but shouldn't be necessary. Too wide and the tire won't fit in the dead furrow, thus making the plow unlevel, and causing a loss of traction. SGT tires (26X12-12's) are too big. If I get up to plowing with super, I'll likely put it on 7-14 tires. If these were land hitch plows, tire size wouldn't be so critical. But it is. As long as you can pull it, keep that 12".
            ~Jonathan
            Oblong, Illinois

            Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

            I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

            Comment


            • Rescue11
              Rescue11 commented
              Editing a comment
              Would love to see a land hitch plow built for a cub!

            • J-Mech
              J-Mech commented
              Editing a comment
              Oh, I don't know. Biggest plow I've seen a Cub pull was a 2 bottom. Maybe because they run out of traction, but I really think it's just all they can do. I mean, we used to plow the garden with an IH 340 with a 2 bottom (16") plow, and it was all it could do. That's 32" of plow. You put 3, 10" plows together and that's 30". The 340 had wheel weights and loaded tires, and a 153 CI 40HP motor and could barely do it. Land hitch would be a build for sure, but it would look funny I think. UNLESS..... you build an articulated 4wd. Now we're talkin!
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