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any MOPAR motorheads? step in my thread

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    any MOPAR motorheads? step in my thread

    My mechanic Matt is restoring a 72 Cuda and wants to install a 440 crank into a 383 block. That will give him a 426 wedge. You use the 440 rods so you can use shorter/lighter pistons.

    In addition to turning the mains smaller at the grinder, I will be fitting the crank to the block. From what I understand, I will be putting a 45* chamfer on the ends of each "pair" of throws / counterbalances to clear the block.

    Anyone else do this and can verify that's what's needed.

    #2
    I wish I could afford to be one! Can't confirm anything either. I just wanted to say my dream car is a '68 Bullitt Charger. I'd take a 69 orange one too.

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      #3
      I'm of no help personally, but I do know who would know.
      I've been watching this guys youtube for a couple years. He's had people call him with questions. He's the guru of mopar. Here's his facebook, and information.
      https://www.facebook.com/indy.auto.p...is.automotive/
      They can't all be turn key.
      Make the best of each and every day.
      Todd
      Original's Start to Finish vid. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GAoUNNiLwKs

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        #4
        I don't know much about what you're doing, but I followed Zippy's link and he's got a motor on the dyno just like your buddy is wanting to do in one of his recent videos:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lk9gN_-0R6g
        Brice

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          #5
          I'm a gear head..... and a motor guy. But all the really hot motors I've built were diesel. Can't help you out, but I'd like to see what you do anyway!

          Are you doing the balancing? Or someone else?
          ~Jonathan
          Oblong, Illinois

          Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

          I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by J-Mech View Post
            I'm a gear head..... and a motor guy. But all the really hot motors I've built were diesel. Can't help you out, but I'd like to see what you do anyway!

            Are you doing the balancing? Or someone else?
            I'm only doing the clearance work on the crank. An automotive machine shop ( with the correct equipment) will take care of turning the 440 crank mains down to 383 size. They will also balance the rotating assembly.

            I was asked "why" and the advantage of the B block ( 383 block ) versus the RB block ( 440 ) is a slightly lower and narrower engine. That equates to an easier time installing headers and engine accessories. This is going in Cuda and not a bigger "B" body car. Also, the rotating mass will be less ( 600 grams from what I found on the web ) which permit the engine to accelerate quicker.

            But the biggest and best reason is Matt said " I don't do normal" when building engines. ( proof is the 403 Cutlass he built which embarrassed quite a few drivers )

            Jeff

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              #7
              a 440 crank into a 400 block is very common, makes a 451 CID.... longer stroke = more torque
              what year Cuda? If 70 or newer that would be an E body (64-69 were A body... think Valiant/ Dart/Duster) the E body had as much room under the hood as a B body. (Charger Road Runner Coronet Satellite Road Runner) OK I see you said 72.... but yeah a stroked B block (361/383/400) puts all the cu inches of an RB (413/426/440) into a slightly smaller package. Think of the BB Chevys, where you had the 427 and 427 "tall block" that was strictly a truck/bus engine. where a 427 in a Chevelle was a shorter deck engine.

              I have a 440 in my garage that I have been storing for my son for a few years, I'm wanting to claim for "storage" as soon as I find the right pickup to put it into....
              Don
              Kankakee IL

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                #8
                I have always wanted a hot rod Mopar but have only been able to afford daily driver 318, after daily driver 318.... have had a few slant 6s and a 360 or 2 mixed in over the years, but other than a couple of 4.0 inline-6 powered Jeeps almost every vehicle I have ever owned since getting my license in 1983, has been 318 powered. currently have 3... a 78 Sport Fury with 53k original miles, a 92 Dakota with 218K and a 96 Dakota 4WD that hit 200K on New Years Day.... plus 2 more on the ground. been thinking of building one of those up for the eventual day that I kill my 4.0 in the Wrangler..... which itself will hit 200K by the end of next week.... owned that one for 19 years now, had 19K on it when I got it....
                Don
                Kankakee IL

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                • Jeff in Pa
                  Jeff in Pa commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I used to have a '69 Dodge A100 van ( long wheelbase ) that mu great uncle purchased brand new. I got it about 1995 and it had 61,789 miles on it. I paid $275 for it. It was a 318 with a column shift 3 speed. I had to put exhaust on it and it was less expensive to run dual exhaust. It sounded great with the low gears and duals.

                #9
                surprised that Rumblefish hasn't seen this yet... I know him from some of the Mopar forums that I occasionally go to.....
                Don
                Kankakee IL

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                  #10
                  I enjoy all flavors of muscle car, but my first love is diesel. Interesting read though, got any pics?

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                    #11
                    20181215_182552.jpg
                    Originally posted by Diesel Doc View Post
                    I enjoy all flavors of muscle car, but my first love is diesel. Interesting read though, got any pics?
                    I have a couple of the body on the frame jig.

                    20181215_182404.jpg

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                      #12
                      Are those the connecting rods for the 440 in the lower pic, to the right? Either way, the journals are pretty big! Looks like over 2" from here.

                      I like the frame dolly!
                      ~Jonathan
                      Oblong, Illinois

                      Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

                      I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

                      Comment


                        #13
                        You know what I'm going to say. I like the 92-96 ford. Haha.
                        Cory.



                        One piece at a time...

                        Comment


                          #14
                          Originally posted by Greenstripewideframe View Post
                          You know what I'm going to say. I like the 92-96 ford. Haha.
                          Well relatively, yeah... If I had to buy a Ford that would be the absolute newest series of Ford truck that I would want.
                          Don
                          Kankakee IL

                          Comment


                            #15
                            Originally posted by J-Mech View Post
                            Are those the connecting rods for the 440 in the lower pic, to the right? Either way, the journals are pretty big! Looks like over 2" from here.

                            I like the frame dolly!
                            I'll check but I think those are 383 rods. The only difference between 383 and 440 rods are the center to center distance. The 440 rods are longer for the "RB" ( raised block ) engine. That allows you to use shorter and lighter pistons in the build.

                            The frame dolly was built using "reclaimed" ( scrap yard) I beams. Matt found the flattest part of his floor and shimmed it using a laser so it was all within 1/16" . Both the "body clamps" and wheel assemblies came from Harbor Freight. He has less than $300 into the entire frame dolly / jig.

                            He priced body clamps and they were close to $200 each from a frame dolly manufacturer. He purchased 4" drill press vises from HF for under $30 each. ( might have been $20 )

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