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    Talk about exact placement

    https://www.facebook.com/news.now.go...3442992935972/
    They can't all be turn key.
    Make the best of each and every day.
    Todd
    Original's Start to Finish vid. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GAoUNNiLwKs

    #2
    I worked for an electric and gas utility for 31 years. During my time there we set a tower with a chopper too. The one we did was half way up the side of a mountain. Our crews assembled the tower in a field in the valley below and a chopper came and lifted it to the pad. It was easier than trying to get heavy equipment to the tower site.

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      #3
      That's actually really cool.

      I have a video somewhere from last summer of a chopper with a big saw on it trimming right of ways. I should post it. It's really cool.
      ~Jonathan
      Oblong, Illinois

      Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

      I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

      Comment


      • zippy1
        zippy1 commented
        Editing a comment
        Yes you should.

      • jaynjeep
        jaynjeep commented
        Editing a comment
        I've seen the same thing here Jon.. quite impressive ... bet that guy gets paid!

      #4
      That looks like the company we used back around 1990 when I worked for a company that built all the HVAC equipment for the new (back then) Toyota Camry plant in Georgetown KY. They flew in from Oregon with long flight fuel tanks that they take off when working. One guy flys the machine and there is a guy in a turret that runs the crane for setting the equipment. We had to attach a set of jumper cables to the building steel and then the RTU before anyone could touch it as we were setting it to discharge the massive static electricity charge it built up from all the turbulence. I think there motto was 10,000 LBS to 10,000 feet.
      Looks like they do the tower thing pretty often.
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bKwAOmBciCU&spfreload=5

      Comment


        #5
        It was amazing to watch them lift the tower we built. I forget the weight but it had to be 8 or 9 thousand pounds as it was a 120 foot tower. The chopper was a big Sikorsky Sky Crane. When it took the strain on the cables, the rotors went from flat to bowl shaped as the rotors tried to climb and the weigh resisted.

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          #6
          Originally posted by Diesel Doc View Post
          It was amazing to watch them lift the tower we built. I forget the weight but it had to be 8 or 9 thousand pounds as it was a 120 foot tower. The chopper was a big Sikorsky Sky Crane. When it took the strain on the cables, the rotors went from flat to bowl shaped as the rotors tried to climb and the weigh resisted.
          There is a shop a couple miles from where I work that works on Sikorsky helicopters. I always see them flying on test flights.

          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

          They put up high tension towers close to where I grew up back in the 70s. Probably a 1/2 mile away. As a curious young teenager, I went up there to where the ground crew was assembling the towers on the ground. I asked about the helicopter pilots and the guy told me they hired vietnam vets as they had nerves of steel. He added that the close work was "easy as hell for them since nobody was shooting at them".

          Comment


            #7
            Originally posted by Oak View Post
            We had to attach a set of jumper cables to the building steel and then the RTU before anyone could touch it as we were setting it to discharge the massive static electricity charge it built up from all the turbulence.
            So, I have to ask..... who hooked the jumper cables to the RTU if you couldn't touch it? I would think the static would arc to the guy holding the jumper cables before he could get them clamped....?
            ~Jonathan
            Oblong, Illinois

            Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

            I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

            Comment


              #8
              Jon, there were 4 guys working the lifting lugs, one guy with the cables and a few foreman making sure each piece got set correct. I was a pee-on back then (still am) and I can remember climbing onto of every piece and using black tape to mark the units so they go set correctly. Each unit was probably 40' long and 15' wide. Fun times.

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                #9
                Jon, the grounding cables are attached to the work using an insulated switch stick. The sticks are insulated to around 25KVA and have an end that can be used to screw a clamp closed that's attached to a 1/0 copper ground cable. The rule of thumb in the industry is "work it live or ground it dead" meaning work with all the rules and tools for live work (energized) or ground it dead so there is no possible chance of stray voltage.

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