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Great Grandfathers drill press.

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    Great Grandfathers drill press.

    This belonged to my great grandfather Bishop. My Dad, his uncle, and Dad brought this back from Bluefield WV 30 some years ago and I think it sat in my grandfather's barn until my Dad and I brought it home a couple years ago. It sat on the floor of my shed since.

    I took on a job drilling some holes in NEMA boxes for a fellow ham a month ago. I have been using unibits and a cordless drill until now. I bought a set of Rotabroach bits last week and immediately realized that I needed a press to do it right.

    Today I braced up the only bench I had room on and bolted it down and wired it up. I'm really digging it!

    IMG_20190903_191015168.jpgIMG_20190903_191035047.jpg

    #2
    That's pretty cool Travis.
    Do you get that, "warm and fuzzy" feeling using it? When I use something of my forefathers, I get a "different" feeling going on. Hard to describe, but it's there...
    They can't all be turn key.
    Make the best of each and every day.
    Todd
    Original's Start to Finish vid. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GAoUNNiLwKs

    Comment


      #3
      Very cool. Great it has a family connection. I have a 1935 Walker Turner drill press but since I bought, it's "just old" ( but still works great)
      Jeff

      (edit-- drill press is a 1935 model)

      Comment


        #4
        Todd, it is definitely a warm and fuzzy feeling as well as seeing green since it's going to make me $$$!

        Jeff, I need to see if I can figure out what year this is. It has a Jacobs 6A chuck on it. I still need to get a key for it. I also need to slow it down some more. Slowest I can get it by the belt is 575 rpm. How about a picture of the Walker Turner?

        Jonathan, I think we need a "Tool Shed" section.

        I had to try it out tonight.

        IMG_20190903_201038748.jpgIMG_20190903_201057027.jpg

        Comment


          #5
          The correct key is a K3 ( I have the same chuck on my WT )
          https://www.mcmaster.com/3169a15

          You need the slow speed attachment which is another step pulley that mounts in between the two pulleys. With that set up, the motor pulley is turned "upside down" so the double belt set up can be used.

          How 'bout a video ?

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ULxY2PCyNqE

          Comment


          • Shrewcub
            Shrewcub commented
            Editing a comment
            As always, you went above and beyond! Thanks! That WT is cool, even though you bought it.

          #6
          Travis, that's really cool!

          I should start a "tools" section. I'll see if I can get that done maybe this evening.
          ~Jonathan
          Oblong, Illinois

          Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

          I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

          Comment


          • Shrewcub
            Shrewcub commented
            Editing a comment
            Thanks Jonathan!

          #7
          I found some more information on the drill press. It was manufactured in 1945 by Duro Metal Products Co. for Montgomery Ward. Looks like it has a 1/2 HP G.E. motor on it.
          IMG_20190903_234326348~2.jpg

          My Dad told me that his grandparents had moved to Princeton, not Bluefield, about that time. My great grandfather was a a machinist but ultimately ended up working in the coal mines. That led to black lung and and early death. My mom's grandfather also died of black lung in SW PA.

          Anyway here's the link to the info I found.

          http://vintagemachinery.org/mfgindex/detail.aspx?id=657

          Comment


            #8
            The drill press has been working great! I've cut 60 3/4" and 20 5/8" holes in 14 gauge hot rolled steel with the annular cutters and drilled 120 1/4" holes through 3/16" aluminum. I got curlies everywhere! My chuck key showed up Saturday. I'd be happy to never pick up a handheld drill again.

            IMG_20190909_221057709.jpg

            Comment


              #9
              Ok...... what the heck are you making drilling all those holes??
              ~Jonathan
              Oblong, Illinois

              Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

              I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

              Comment


                #10
                IMG_20190724_152413151_HDR.jpg Your answer is in the first post. All I am making is $$$$. Here is a picture of the finished product minus some wiring. My job is just making the holes.

                Comment


                  #11
                  Very Nice Travis!! I couldn't get along in my shop without a drill press.. might use it three times a day and then not use it for a month.. but it's always ready if I need it.. The old stuff is always the best.. nice that you have a story to go with it.. some of my favorite tools are 60 plus years old.. stuff was just made so much better back then!

                  Comment


                    #12
                    Thanks Jay! Yesterday I brought home the matching bench grinder. My great uncle (GGF's son) had this since he brought it back from WV. I just need to finish the wiring tomorrow. IMG_20190918_204656341.jpgIMG_20190918_204818093.jpg

                    Comment


                      #13
                      Awesome!! More cool old tools!!

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