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Gas in briggs and Stratton engine tank

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    Gas in briggs and Stratton engine tank

    My IH CC push mower I am putting away for the winter. I ran it today until it shut off to run the gas out. When it shut off I looked in the gas tank and there is a little bit in the bottom. There isn’t really a way to drain it out that I can see. It’s ethanol gas which is why I’m not sure if it should be left. Will the little bit left in the tank be fine to sit for winter?
    Attached Files

    #2
    You should always store a metal gas tank full of fuel. It prohibits rust, and is less likely to cause issues with gas in the carb. Seals and o-rings dry out when no gas is present. I suggest filling the tank up, and adding some Marvel Mystery Oil or Sea Foam for winter storage. I use no additives whatsoever, and run ethanol fuel. In my 20 or so small engines, in 20+ years, I've never had issues.
    ~Jonathan
    Oblong, Illinois

    Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

    I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

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      #3
      The last time I look Briggs recommends to run engine out of gas for storage over 30 days. That is what I do. I have a Cub Cadet push mower with the same engine on it. Mine leaves a little gas in the bottom of the tank like yours. Been doing that for 20 plus years with no issues.

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        #4
        Thank you for the reply’s guys. I think I will put fuel back in it and maybe Marvel Mystery oil and let it set. Wasn’t sure about this since I run the fuel out of my Kawasaki engines I wondered if this engine would be different and I’d rather do the correct procedure with my CC so it can warm up and start in the spring with no issues.

        And here are my two IH CC’s tucked away for winter!
        Attached Files

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          #5
          You've had all good answers. My "choice" is full tanks of fuel with StaBil. Run the tractor for a few minuets, shut the fuel off, let the tractor run out the fuel, remove battery. Next year, install battery, turn the fuel valve on, and go...
          They can't all be turn key.
          Make the best of each and every day.
          Todd
          Original's Start to Finish vid. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GAoUNNiLwKs

          Comment


            #6
            My preference is to run the carburetor out of fuel. Leave a metal tank full, and a plastic tank empty.

            Merk and J-Mech, I hate to be "that guy," but in real life I'm a politician with a pet peeve for stupid laws, one of which happens to be the Biofuels Act of 2006, a G.W. Bush law that Obama should have repealed before it took full effect in 2011, when E-10 became a federal mandate. You haven't been storing your equipment with today's ethanol fuel for 20+ years. As of today, you're a few months shy of doing it that way for 8 years (which is still a pretty good track record).

            I can't help but think that if the engineers that used to build stuff to last wouldn't have suggested leaving today's trash fuel in their carbs for 6 months if they knew it would turn to varnish in 4 while encouraging the gas tank to rust.

            If that particular model siphons fuel up and into the carb when the engine ie running, and there is no way to install a shut off valve, I would run it out of gas, refill the tank, and not pull the rope until it's time to cut grass. If your machine has a shut off valve (or if you can install one), then shut off the gas and let it run until she's empty.

            You can avoid all this and have better results by making sure you use non-ethanol fuel in the fall. Expect to pay around $70 for a 5 gallon pail of race gas at some Sunoco stations. It can be cheaper at a race track or the needle in a haystack station that carries it. If you have home heating oil delivered to your house, ask if they can deliver a couple gallons. Your 2 stroke engines will love it, and to be perfectly honest, while we're on the subject of antiques, race gas, and federal fuel mandates, the closest to spec fuel available for just about every engine made before 1973 is currently marketed as leaded racing fuel, which isn't much different than premium fresh from the pump in 1969.

            Sorry for going on a little rant about the government, I tend to do that from time to time. I could go on about gas cans, but I'll stop here.

            Comment


              #7
              Cheesedawg82
              Hey bud.... E-10 may not have been mandated prior to 2011, but it was most certainly available. I've been using 10% blend for right about 20 years. Hate to tell you, but a lot of farms switched to E-10 back in the 1980's. It's nothing new. Now, if you want to debate that the quality of fuel we have now isn't what it used to be, I'll go with that. We have a good sized Marathon refinery in the town over. My dad has worked there 30 years, and sits at a pretty nice desk. For years now they just keep adding scrubbers, and "plants" that take this or that "dangerous" XXX out of gas or diesel fuel. Fuel isn't what it was for sure. But 10% ethanol gasoline is old school news.
              ~Jonathan
              Oblong, Illinois

              Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

              I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

              Comment


                #8
                Cheesedawg82 yea with my three mowers that have plastic tanks I do run empty every year and they start right up in the spring....... just wasn’t sure about doing the same with the metal tank.

                “If that particular model siphons fuel up and into the carb when the engine ie running, and there is no way to install a shut off valve, I would run it out of gas, refill the tank, and not pull the rope until it's time to cut grass. If your machine has a shut off valve (or if you can install one), then shut off the gas and let it run until she's empty.”

                Like you say in that paragraph. I ran this mower out of fuel then refilled it and added a little Marvel Mystery oil and will not pull the rope again till spring. I don’t know how I would add a fuel shut off easily to this mower and don’t really want to mess with that so it will stay “as is”

                Comment


                  #9
                  Gas is better now than it was when we had MTB. Gas with ethanol has been around since the 1980's. It was called Bio Gas back them (If my memory is working right). I look at some old Kohler and Briggs manuals that I have and they all say it is ok to use gas with 10% ethanol in it. They also say drain fuel if the engine will be stored over 30 days.

                  The majority of the problems I still see is poor fuel storage-handling habits. Then you get some small engine owners that have a burr up their bonnet because the government mandated ethanol in there fuel.

                  I'm not a big fan of leaving gas sit in the fuel tank. The components in the fuel will separate and can cause problems when you start up in the spring.

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