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    K301A RPM issue

    I found my lack of engine RPM at full throttle issue to be the governor spring. It was old and worn out. I wasn’t really able to find much help in pointing me to this conclusion, so I hope it can help someone else some day. My local small engine shop had one in stock.

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    #2
    I hope it fixes your problem.
    Cory.



    One piece at a time...

    Comment


      #3
      It did.

      Comment


        #4
        Good deal.

        Did you set the governor up for the new spring? Check your high idle, no load speed?
        ~Jonathan
        Oblong, Illinois

        Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

        I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

        Comment


          #5
          i was only able to get 2600 rpm before, I tweaked the spring to make it a little ‘tighter’ and was able to get 3200 rpm out of it. This is when I knew the spring was worn out. I put the new spring on and adjusted the throttle cable, it now goes well over 3200rpm. I did have to adjust governor sensitivity to keep it from surging. I believe it’s in the second hole from the bottom of the arm. I can’t tell you what the high idle rpm is at, I was using a cheap multimeter with rpm function that won’t read over 3300. I’m planning on getting a handheld tachometer to make sure I’m not over 3800rpm- no load. Does anyone have any recommendations? I was looking at some optical ones. I’ve never had to use one before. My snap on dealer didn’t have one on his truck and I don’t really feel like spending $300 on one.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by DewDrop View Post
            i was only able to get 2600 rpm before, I tweaked the spring to make it a little ‘tighter’ and was able to get 3200 rpm out of it. This is when I knew the spring was worn out. I put the new spring on and adjusted the throttle cable, it now goes well over 3200rpm.
            You know there is a throttle lever stop on the side of the engine that you move to get the RPM set correct? I agree the old spring was worn out and needed replaced, but there is usually a lot of available movement that isn't used. Also, that is how you set the high idle RPM. I've seen some engines missing the stop. Make sure you have it on yours.

            Did you readjust the governor to the cross shaft? If you didn't, you should just to be sure it is right. People take carbs off, and mess with all kinds of things. That is one of the tune up items I always check anytime I am working on a motor. Easy adjustment to make.


            Originally posted by DewDrop View Post
            I did have to adjust governor sensitivity to keep it from surging. I believe it’s in the second hole from the bottom of the arm.
            Stock (or standard) placement for the governor spring is in the third hole from the governor cross shaft. Most all engines run good there. If you can't get it to run in that hole without surging, you have other issues. Sounds to me like you have the sensitivity too dull. It will lug.

            On a related note, the different holes in the throttle control arm, where the other end of the spring is attached, do not affect sensitivity. They are for getting the correct dash lever movement. Position the spring in a hole that gives you full dash throttle range. Cable adjustment may also be necessary.


            Originally posted by DewDrop View Post
            I can’t tell you what the high idle rpm is at, I was using a cheap multimeter with rpm function that won’t read over 3300. I’m planning on getting a handheld tachometer to make sure I’m not over 3800rpm- no load. Does anyone have any recommendations? I was looking at some optical ones. I’ve never had to use one before. My snap on dealer didn’t have one on his truck and I don’t really feel like spending $300 on one.
            I have a Blue Point phototach. I'm sure I spent 3 digits on it at least. I also have a timing light that reads engine speed, and a multi-meter that does. There are lots of cheap photo/laser tachometers that you can buy online. I'll keep my Blue Point.
            ~Jonathan
            Oblong, Illinois

            Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

            I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by J-Mech View Post

              You know there is a throttle lever stop on the side of the engine that you move to get the RPM set correct? I agree the old spring was worn out and needed replaced, but there is usually a lot of available movement that isn't used. Also, that is how you set the high idle RPM. I've seen some engines missing the stop. Make sure you have it on yours.
              Yes the throttle lever stop is on the side. I will need to adjust that once I can see the RPM.

              Originally posted by J-Mech View Post

              Did you readjust the governor to the cross shaft? If you didn't, you should just to be sure it is right. People take carbs off, and mess with all kinds of things. That is one of the tune up items I always check anytime I am working on a motor. Easy adjustment to make.
              I did adjust the cross shaft back to what I believe is the initial setting of 2-7/8” length. I’m still not fully sure of what the change in length does. I played around with it and it didn’t seem to make any difference that I could notice.

              This tractor is new to me. It wasn’t running when I got it so I don’t have anything to compare it to. It’s also my first cub so I’m not very familiar with much of these setting and such. Luckily I have the manuals to work with, All of this information is great, thank you.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by DewDrop View Post
                I did adjust the cross shaft back to what I believe is the initial setting of 2-7/8” length. I’m still not fully sure of what the change in length does. I played around with it and it didn’t seem to make any difference that I could notice.
                No, no. That is the throttle control, or governor to carb connecting link. Although, it is good you readjusted it. I know you changed it. For the record.... don't ever mess with it, unless making sure it is in adjustment.

                I'm talking about adjusting the governor. The procedure is on page 6.27 of the Kohler K series manual.
                If you don't have a copy, you can get it here.
                You need to do that adjustment. That being out of adjustment will make it surge, and also limit max throttle settings.


                Originally posted by DewDrop View Post
                All of this information is great, thank you.
                We're here to help!
                ~Jonathan
                Oblong, Illinois

                Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

                I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by J-Mech View Post

                  I'm talking about adjusting the governor. The procedure is on page 6.27 of the Kohler K series manual.
                  If you don't have a copy, you can get it here.
                  You need to do that adjustment. That being out of adjustment will make it surge, and also limit max throttle settings.
                  Ah yes I see what you are saying now, I did adjust that, thank you.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by DewDrop View Post

                    Ah yes I see what you are saying now, I did adjust that, thank you.
                    Good deal!




                    Since the engine (tractor) is new to you, I would also suggest:
                    • Pulling the head and cleaning the combustion chamber, planing the head and installing a new gasket. Most all of them leak (head gasket) and need changed. It's actually in the service manual to do on an hour interval. Make sure to retorque the head bolts.
                    • Pulling the vent and adjusting the valves. Good thing to do to an old motor. Makes them start easier, and run more efficiently. Make sure to install the vent correctly on assembly.
                    • File the points, and set the timing. Not the point gap, mind you.... the ignition timing. Gapping the points is not a good way to time these engines.
                    • Check the other ignition components. Make sure the plug is good, wire is good, no corrosion in the coil top post, condenser is grounded good.
                    • Clean and check the fuel system. If the tractor was running/driving when you bought it, you may be good to go.
                    This is all the things I do to Kohlers when I first get them, unless they look like they have been done, or I don't detect any issues. (That rarely happens.) Most of the gaskets can be gotten at a local part store that deals with Kohler, or aftermarket such as Prime Line or Stens. You can also buy online. On the head gasket, just make sure that you get a good one with a fire ring around the combustion chamber. There are cheap ones that don't have it. It ends badly, as Jeff in PA.
                    ~Jonathan
                    Oblong, Illinois

                    Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

                    I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

                    Comment


                      #11
                      When I was at the small engine shop, he had a Kohler Head gasket in stock ( it does have the fire ring ) so I picked it up. I did notice a slight dampness of oil on the exhaust side of the engine.
                      I did adjust timing, valve clearance, and cleaned the carburetor as well as replace the spark plug. I am amazed at how well this thing runs!

                      As far as the head gasket goes, I have seen some guys online Planing the head with glass and sandpaper... is this the preferred method or should I bring it to the machine shop?

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Yes, glass planing is good method.

                        This is from Tim, one of our members.
                        https://www.everythingcubcadet.com/f...ad-resurfacing
                        ~Jonathan
                        Oblong, Illinois

                        Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

                        I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

                        Comment

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