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Bringing a 100 back to life.

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    Bringing a 100 back to life.

    Thought I would drag this over from OCC where I started a thread back in Nov of 2017.
    A little history on the tractor. A friend of mine called and ask me if I would be interested in a cub cadet 100 he had found in a barn of a guy he was doing some work for.
    I gave the guy a call and went and looked at it, and let me tell you it wasn't a cream puff. But the guy had all the paper work including the owners manual from when he bought it in 1964. The PO told me he cut grass with it up until about 5 or 6 years ago. He bought a new mower and put this one in the barn where it had sat till now. I wasn't to impressed at the shape it looked but I had been looking for a project and I have always wanted an O or a 100 to bring back to life. It was covered with chicken shit, hay and a couple of rat nest. But the metal wasn't rusted to bad, frame was in good shape, the engine turned by hand, the deck looked in pretty good shape. And at the almost free price I couldn't turn it down. Here's a few pics of it after I got it home. More info and pics will follow as I go through what I have done to it over the past few months.
    You do not have permission to view this gallery.
    This gallery has 6 photos.
    Larry
    New Market, Alabama

    #2
    Looks like a great project! Pretty well complete and with a decent deck too. Keep us posted on your progress.

    Comment


      #3
      Looks to be a decent project Larry. Barn fresh is good.
      I got my 100 from a field. So, you're ahead of the game.
      Please, keep us informed with the transformation.
      They can't all be turn key.
      Make the best of each and every day.
      Todd
      Original's Start to Finish vid. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GAoUNNiLwKs

      Comment


        #4
        Thanks for starting a thread here Larry! I remember the 100 now that I see it.

        Keep us updated!!
        ~Jonathan
        Oblong, Illinois

        Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

        I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

        Comment


          #5
          Neat barn find. Fenders, headlights and looks solid. Great project.

          Comment


            #6
            More on the 100. After giving it a good pressure wash I pulled it into the shop and began disassembly. Took lots of PB and a few skinned knuckles but I got it done. I had a terrible fight with removing the axle from the frame. There was nothing I tried at driving the pin out worked even heat from acetylene. I finely had to take my angle grinder and cut the front lobe off the frame, spread the channel to get the axle out. I then locked the axle in the drill press and drilled a hole through the center of the pin where I could heat the center of the pin to drive it out. Boy it was a PITA. I plan on reassembly of the axle in the channel using a 8 grade bolt with lock nut, and add a grease fitting in the axle. I didn't take any pics of what I did to the axle channel (wish I had) to get maybe some different ideas of when I replace it.
            You do not have permission to view this gallery.
            This gallery has 6 photos.
            Larry
            New Market, Alabama

            Comment


              #7
              Going to be a nice project. Keep it up!

              Comment


                #8
                Don't worry about the axle bolster, anything can be fixed, just takes a little more time is all. The tractor deserves to be saved.

                Comment


                  #9
                  After getting the tractor broke down I went to looking what I was going to need to make a trailer queen out of her, I don't plan on working this tractor. I might do a Zippy, and put it in the living room . Anyway she is gonna need a ton of work. I gave the parts a good degreasing and pressure wash. Cleaned up pretty well. I first started with the engine pulled the head, it's in need of a head gasket and attention to the head and valves. I pulled the oil pan and all looked good there, no metal or unknown debris in there. The cylinder looked good no scratches and was smooth, top of piston looked good. In looking at the piston I seen it had 10 stamped in it so I am assuming it had been rebuilt sometime in the past. I ordered parts including carb kit, points, condenser and gaskets. while waiting on parts I began cleaning the engine, and attempting to remove the PTO, that's another story in itself. More to come.
                  You do not have permission to view this gallery.
                  This gallery has 5 photos.
                  Larry
                  New Market, Alabama

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Good start Larry! Engine looks like it's pretty clean.
                    ~Jonathan
                    Oblong, Illinois

                    Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

                    I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Next came removing the PTO and the damn thing fought me everyway possible, 2 of the set screws would not come out no matter what I tried. soaking in PB for days, heat, and broke 2 drill bits. I figured if I kept at it I was gonna ruin the threads and not be able to use the clutch pulley, I went for broke and took a 3 jaw puller and an impact wench and off it came. In doing so it broke the pressure spring and bent the throw out levers. I then locked the pulley a vise at the drill press, taking a cobalt bit a little smaller than the set screw and drilled them out with no damage to the threads. I resurfaced the pulley and de rusted it. Got on E Bay and found some used throw out levers and a used pressure spring and ordered them, also ordered a new bearing and clutch. All and all turned out pretty well. Next up the drive clutch.
                      You do not have permission to view this gallery.
                      This gallery has 4 photos.
                      Larry
                      New Market, Alabama

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Looks like you're having way to much fun Larry. Not.
                        Those set screws can be a bugger at times. Good to hear you got them out.
                        They can't all be turn key.
                        Make the best of each and every day.
                        Todd
                        Original's Start to Finish vid. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GAoUNNiLwKs

                        Comment


                        • bamafan
                          bamafan commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Thanks Zippy, I suppose I could have just bought another PTO. (wouldn't have broke the bank), but I'm hard headed and was determined it wasn't going the best of me.

                        #13
                        Sometimes those PTO's are a real PITA. I've got one on a motor that's stuck and I need to get it off. Been waiting on me for like 9 months, lol.
                        Keep going Larry!!!
                        ~Jonathan
                        Oblong, Illinois

                        Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

                        I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

                        Comment


                          #14
                          Next came the clutch and as bad as it looked wasn't a bad rebuild at all, a lot of cleaning and de-rusting. Of course had to order new parts, throw out bearing, teaser spring, and clutch disk. The drive shaft was in good shape. Clutch plates were ok just needed resurfaced. After taking it apart I put all the parts to be reused in a bucket of vinegar and let them soak for a few days. Wire brushed the parts on a bench grinder including the drive shaft. Resurfaced the clutch plates on my belt sander, Took a lot of time but everything cleaned up really nice. Primed and painted.
                          When it came time to reassemble I knew it was gonna be a pain to compress the spring to get the pin in the shaft and since I didn't have the materials to build one like I had seen on you tube videos I used what I had on hand. I dug around in the woodworking side of the shop and found some materials to make a redneck spring compression tool. It consisted of 2 pieces of 2x8 and 2 threaded rods washers and nuts, worked like a charm. Now guys I have never rebuilt a clutch on a cub before, but I'm pleased with the outcome.
                          You do not have permission to view this gallery.
                          This gallery has 7 photos.
                          Larry
                          New Market, Alabama

                          Comment


                            #15
                            Did you check your clutch plates for flatness on a piece of glass? I'm glad you were able to do it yourself but I wonder how flat and parallel the clutch plates are.

                            Hope it works well for you

                            Comment


                            • bamafan
                              bamafan commented
                              Editing a comment
                              Yep sure did Jeff, They weren't in that bad of shape to start with, Thanks
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