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    124 bulldozer

    Well my dad has officially named the 124 with the front blade the "little bulldozer". Its come in handy on a couple jobs so far,
    We've been chasing an intermittent loading of the engine off an on for several months (gimme a break, its been used once since fall of the year). While searching for the problem, we have found a ton of "that might be it" issues. Already replaced a bunch of sketchy wiring and bad connections. Decided a valve was getting lazy, so off with the head. Appears head is leaking on both sides of the gasket, gonna face it off. Exhaust valve had a dark, rough spot on the stem--thinking this may have been slowing its movement down, so polishing it up. Intake looks pretty good, will clean it up as well. Got to digging in my stash and I think I have a new intake valve--if so guess where its going. The exhaust really needs touching on a grinder. The seats look better than the valves, may be able to just get by lapping them. I'll figure it out as I go--remember this is NOT for mowing the yard 2 hours a week so I'm not sending it to a machine shop to have the seats ground properly.

    Also found the really nice used muffler we "lost" back when I cleaned up the shop a month ago--it will replace the original IH muffler on the machine. Also going to address the sponge of a gas tank--I can't tell if I have one leak or 15.

    I did notice the belt on the hydraulic pump looks "experienced"--Guess I need to replace it. And the driveline, well the clutch doesn't slip but something just doesn't feel right---does it ever end with these things???

    #2
    50 year old tractors need tinkering and maintenance. Once you get thru the major stuff it will be fine for another 50. Cub Cadets (old ones) are like cockroaches - you can't kill em!

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      #3
      Originally posted by Diesel Doc View Post
      50 year old tractors need tinkering and maintenance. Once you get thru the major stuff it will be fine for another 50. Cub Cadets (old ones) are like cockroaches - you can't kill em!
      Oh yeah, can't kill it for sure. This is one of those "I don't know why I bought it, but here it is" ,machines. It keeps growing on me. I've added the blade, put fluid in the tires, added weights on the rear. I'm hoping ot just tinker with this one a little at the time while keeping it useable---don't really have time to tear it all down---and I have a need for it right now!

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        #4
        Well John, it'll do what you "need" it to do, once you get the gremlins beaten out of it.
        They can't all be turn key.
        Make the best of each and every day.
        Todd
        Original's Start to Finish vid. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GAoUNNiLwKs

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          #5
          Well, the clutch seems to be releasing fine, probably need to adjust the brakes. This may have something to do with the "spongy feel"--found a nice big crack in the part the release bearing is anchored to. Also the little spring is broken. Hmmmm, me thinks the engine is gonna have to come out sooner or later---makes me feel better about replacing the pump belt,

          On another note, check out this NOS sediment bowl--yeah its not Cadet, but its good stuff.

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            #6
            lets try the fuel bowl photo again. I think its been here for about 25 years--trash from a former IH dealer when they were thinning out their Wisconsin engine parts.

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              #7
              John, I wouldn't replace the valves without grinding the seats. It will help it for a while, but it won't seal up well. If you want to try and help it out, you are much better off lapping the old valves than replacing them. FWIW, you wouldn't have to disassemble anything to get the seats ground. Find a shop that still has a portable seat grinder instead of a cutter, and get them to do it. If you were close, I still use the old handheld style of seat grinder. I'd do it for you as it sits. Just have to cover everything up really good, and clean it good afterword to make sure any of the stone material doesn't get into the block. That's my advice....
              ~Jonathan
              Oblong, Illinois

              Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

              I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by J-Mech View Post
                John, I wouldn't replace the valves without grinding the seats. It will help it for a while, but it won't seal up well. If you want to try and help it out, you are much better off lapping the old valves than replacing them. FWIW, you wouldn't have to disassemble anything to get the seats ground. Find a shop that still has a portable seat grinder instead of a cutter, and get them to do it. If you were close, I still use the old handheld style of seat grinder. I'd do it for you as it sits. Just have to cover everything up really good, and clean it good afterword to make sure any of the stone material doesn't get into the block. That's my advice....
                Know exactly what you are talking about, that's the style they had where dad worked. Exhaust is pretty rough, I'll feel better if that one gets touched on a grinder. The intake is really not bad. Yeah, hit the seats with some lapping compound. A buddy is going to grind the exhaust after work, he doesn't have the machine for the seats though. For no more than this one will get ran, should be OK.

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                  #9
                  I like that one, and with the hydraulic pump even better. Tell your dad it’s new name is the “Cub-erpillar”

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                    #10
                    A little more to the story. I chucked the very end of the valves in my lathe to clean off the carbon and polish the stems with scotch-brite. It seemed the exhaust had some run-out. Stopped by buddy's tonight to get him to grind it and yep, it was warped pretty bad. Grind no more than was required to clean up, looks to still be enough left to use--edge of the valve is closer to the seat than we would like, but should be OK. I had him touch the intake while he was at it then I lapped both of them once I got them home. Before lapping I inked them up and both cleared up right away. Going to take the head to work and fly cut it back flat tomorrow. Hopefully stick it back together tomorrow night. I'll probably leave the clutch issues alone for now (don't really have a spare round-tuit). Engine really needs to come out to replace the spring and hydraulic belt. The fork has 2 different size pins/bolts in it and is still sloppy. Really just needs proper inspection and repair as needed.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Arnie Cunningham View Post
                      I like that one, and with the hydraulic pump even better. Tell your dad it’s new name is the “Cub-erpillar”
                      Glad you like it. Here's a couple more pics. The rear weights are 2 extra plate steel IH suitcase weights--no modifications done to the lawnmower or the weights. Yes, its stuck and yes I knew better but what fun is that?!?! By the way, the belly blade was a noble attempt by the PO. It just didn't work that well. It was actually the reason I bought this one.

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                        #12
                        Little more headway tonight. Valves back in, breather/cover installed. Head on and torqued. Replaced a pin that was on one side of the clutch fork, really wasn't even held in well. Used a bolt and double nutted it like the other side. The piece it bolts on is really worn bad. This will require a good repair when I pull the driveline, thinking of welding a washer inside of that part. Welded up the crack, hopefully it will help for a while. Need to run it a few minutes and then retorque head. Charge up the battery and put it back under the shed until a more "boring" time around here. Oh yeah, hopefully the new fuel bowl assembly solves the leaks, if not I'll be inquiring about soldering the tank, looks OK but...…...

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                          #13
                          How'd it run John?
                          ~Jonathan
                          Oblong, Illinois

                          Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

                          I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by J-Mech View Post
                            How'd it run John?
                            Didn't get that far yet. Still have to put the carb on and a fuel supply. Had some outdoor work this afternoon, then tonight is was basketball (yes, dang near the whole state stops for that during tournament play, especially here on tobacco road). Hopefully I can crank it up tomorrow, need to put something else in the shop. Spring is coming fast! Good or bad, I'll update just as soon as I turn a couple more wrenches.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              What's basketball?
                              ~Jonathan
                              Oblong, Illinois

                              Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

                              I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

                              Comment

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