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1250 transmission leak and brake plunger.

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    1250 transmission leak and brake plunger.

    Question for everyone. I have a 1250 that is leaking fluid around where the plunger for the brake goes into the transmission. This is the first Cadet I've owned with the internal brake, so I'm not familiar with it. I have a service manual for it, and to change the "pads" it says to split the tractor and remove the rear constant mesh gear. The brakes work fine, and have adjustment left, so I think the pads are sound, it's just weeping around the plunger. Question, do I need to do all that work to remove the plunger? Can I drain the oil, remove the linkage and just withdraw the plunger with the tractor raised up? I was hoping I don't have to go through all the effort to remove the transaxle, and disassemble it just to change an O-ring. Thoughts and knowledge on this? Thank You!.

    #2
    Welcome to the forum!

    If you can get the brake lever rockshaft off the transmission, then you are lucky enough to get the brake puck out of the rusty hole.... and you don't mind working on your back, lol... yes, you can do it on the tractor. But, for what it's worth, it's not hard to pull the transmission, split it and do the job.
    ~Jonathan
    Oblong, Illinois

    Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

    I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

    Comment


      #3
      Ok. Thank you for the information. I'm thiking I may try to remove the plunger in situation. Is there any chance of the "puck" of the brake pad dropping into the housing when I attempt to withdraw the plunger?

      Comment


        #4
        The brake pad is bonded to the brake puck. Unless it has already lost it's bond, it will remain intact. If the bond is already broken, it won't be attached to the puck and will already be in the bottom of the trans. No, it won't come off. Never seen that happen. The job you are getting ready to do is not the most fun. Kind of funny, I am getting ready to do it too on a tractor I'm working on.
        ~Jonathan
        Oblong, Illinois

        Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

        I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

        Comment


          #5
          You may be better off splitting the tractor. It "sounds" hard, but it's not that bad.
          By the time you mess around doing it the hard way, you'd been better served by splitting it. Shit, I'm in a chair, and it's not really that bad.
          It's your time, but just saying, it's really not the worst thing to do.
          Good luck, either way.
          They can't all be turn key.
          Make the best of each and every day.
          Todd
          Original's Start to Finish vid. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GAoUNNiLwKs

          Comment


            #6
            Ok. I've been dealing with the drip for a few years now, so honestly I'm more focused on getting the tractor prepped for the upcoming lawnmowing, so I'll probably deal with it later. I do appriecate the input though! I'll probably give the removal in situation a shot, and if that fails just bite the bullet and remove the drivetrain.

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            • jaynjeep
              jaynjeep commented
              Editing a comment
              I did that job a while back.. I had the rear axle torn down for a cleanout of moisture ridden hytran and a re seal.. somehow I wound up with a whole bag of o-rings for the brake plunger.. be glad to send you one or two! there is usually rust and crud in front of the plunger.. making it hard to get out the front.. rockshaft may or may not come right out.. I had to heat mine to get it apart.. I agree with the others .. you will probably want to pull the rear out to do the job
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