Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

My 169 project

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    My 169 project

    As I posted in my welcome message, I picked up a 169 at an unbelievable price and have been slowly working on it. Since I didn't know anything about it or if it was going to take more repairs than I cared to deal with I've been working on it on the cheap. So far I fixed up some wiring issues, put on a new fuel line, points, condenser, spark plug, spark plug wire and coil. After all that I finally got it fired up and it purrs like a kitten, sounds really good and no smoke. I took it for a quick spin down my driveway and back up and it didn't have any issue pulling the steep hill so that was promising. I also tested and the hydraulic lift goes up and down with no issues. Now that I know everything major is there, I plan on getting a replacement gasket for the points cover and a gasket for the air cleaner housing. Does anyone happen to know what size screws are needed to attach the housing to the carb and also happen to have a link to a readily available air filter? Another thing on the list is the factory ignition is still in place so I want to buy a replacement key for that and see if by chance it works. After that my next major project is the brakes don't seem to do a thing. I didn't really look at them much, hopefully I'll get lucky and they just need adjusted. I picked up a wide frame snow plow for it someone didn't know what it fit and lowered it to $50. It doesn't have the bar for the lift mechanism but that looks like it should be fairly easy to bend something up that will be functional. I also want to clean up the original front rims and then swap the tires over to them, but the ones that came with the tires I picked up work for now. Hopefully my image attachments work!

    20210801_121405.jpg
    20210801_121357.jpg
    20210801_121428.jpg

    #2
    Hello again. Tractor looks like it is overall in excellent condition! The rims you put on, along with the tires, look just like the original ones that would have came out on the machine. I don't see the need to change them. Besides, have you ever tried to dismount a 50 year old lawn tractor tire?? They typically fall apart when you do. Unless you need to swap them out, I wouldn't.

    You can for sure make your own lift rod if you would like to, but you can also contact our member Jeff who makes reproduction Cub Cadet parts. He builds new adjustable lift rods (a good improvement over original) for a very reasonable price. Check out his page by clicking the link up top labeled Parts By Jeff in the red header bar.

    You can easily source a new key for the original ignition. Remember, it is an IH key, not an Indak key.

    As far as the screws for the filter base, the parts book calls for a 10-32 X 3/8. Hopefully the screw holes in the carb are not stripped out as is very common.

    The air filter is still available from CCC or from any parts store of your choice. It will use a Wix number 42299, or a Napa 2299. Any store can cross those numbers. Original part number is a 759-3359 which supersedes to 4588302S1C. You can also get an air filter anywhere that sells Kohler parts. It's a pretty common air filter honestly.

    You can look up any of the parts for your machine on Cub Cadets online parts lookup, here. I already linked you to the page for the 169.

    Some things I see that you will need to address:
    First of all, I hope you purchased the correct ignition coil. As I recall, it takes a 3 ohm coil. Not just any coil will work.
    Second, I see that the coil is not properly mounted. It should be attached on the rear side (right side viewing the coil) to the bolt that the condenser is mounted to. They share a bolt. It will have to be mounted correctly so that the air cleaner will clear. Otherwise, they will contact each other.
    Third, the ignition wire you used won't work as a permanent replacement. The right angle at the coil does not have a boot on it, which will be an issue, but also it needs to be straight up out of the coil so as to clear the air filter. You will need to either purchase one from Kohler, or have one made. I make my own ignition cables for Kohler engines, but as a mechanic, I stocked all the parts to do so. You can use a graphite cable, but originally it was copper. A part store may have some universal cables that you make up to fit but will likely come for a 4 cylinder engine. Whatever works best for you.
    Fourth, I see the choke cable hanging, do you have the choke cable mount so that you can hook it back up? That you will likely have to find used as they don't make that part any longer.

    On the issue of the brake pads, if they are more than out of adjustment, you will have to reline the old pads, or have a shop that specializes in that type of work do it for you. It's not an easy job, but not terribly difficult either. I see that some brake pads are again for sale through CCC, but you won't like the price. Over $100 for two, and you need 4. They are sold individually, not like automotive brake pads which are sold as a set. Anyway, if it comes to replacing them, come back and let us know and we/I can help you find the parts and walk you through changing them.

    Good luck on your 169!!

    ~Jonathan
    Oblong, Illinois

    Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

    I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

    Comment


      #3
      Hi thanks for the information. In regard to the tires, the difference in them is the dish of the rim and where the valve stem is mounted. If I mounted them the way the factory wheels were the valve stem would face in and in turn hit the steering spindles. Not really a big deal it just gives the front of the tractor a slightly wider stance, but if I would decide to go for a restoration it would make my list.

      As for the things to address, the short answer is yes everything will be normal, what you see is what it took to kind of toss together and be able to say it is running. We had discussed the coil in my original welcome post, I did find one with the correct resistance and was listed as a factory replacement, with that being said, it was just a little bigger diameter than the original coil and the screw to tighten the bracket around it wasn't quite long enough, so that is actually on my list to get a longer screw so I can secure it properly and get it mounted back up properly. That factory replacement coil certainly wasn't a factory replacement though as the original one had a male center pin and the one I received was a female. I did check the resistance however and it was within the proper range. When I do mount the coil back up properly I'm going to also reattach the factory choke bracket and have that all properly adjusted.

      The spark plug wire is worthy of a paragraph in itself. I kind of feel like wire that was on it was the original wire based on the age and the fact it was a stranded copper core wire, however you stated the wire comes straight out of the coil and that one came out at a 90 with a boot. The original wire had failed inside the boot of of the spark plug end where it would lose continuity depending on how it was bent. Originally I was hoping I could source one from an auto parts store, but alas I lost faith when I went to my local store and showed them the spark plug wire and they needed me to remind them what it was called. I stopped at a local garage but run by a younger kid and my results weren't much better. The wire you saw in the picture was just a Frankenstein setup from an old auto wire that was "engineered" to fit that coil. Locally the best I found was at another auto parts store they did have a kit to make your own but I just don't feel like a red spark plug wire would color coordinate very well. You mentioned sourcing the wire from Kohler, since I have to pick up a few gaskets anyways I may just go that route assuming they don't think their wires are made of gold.

      I took the rear wheels off over the weekend to check out the brakes, I have a few theories on what happened, but the end result is the brake adjusters were totally backed off and I now have brakes after adjusting them. My first thought is that they were trying to figure out how to get it to free wheel and that was the first thing they tried, but then on the left hand side I noticed the one bolt to mount the transmission to the frame was loose and the other one is actually missing. I'm wondering if at some point they didn't have the transmission off or swapped it and never finished the job. I'm going to make sure I find a replacement bolt for that before I put it under any kind of major load. Taking the rear wheels of was kind of dual purpose though, I made a bit of a road trip over the weekend to pickup a part that I wanted to get as they seem to be hard to get and finding them at a reasonable price is even harder.
      20210807_194941.jpg
      The pin and Brinly adapter seem much easier to find, so I can patiently wait for that as I really don't have a purpose for the lift at the moment but it was available at the right price. Also while visiting my father and discussing the tractor, the topic of the volt meter instead of the ohm meter came up and it turns out he had an old ohm meter that looks to be the exact size that I need. While not IH branded it certainly has the look and age to it so it will serve the purpose until I perhaps decide to go the route of a full restoration.

      Finally while looking at a video on the lift installation I noticed something that I wanted to question, here is a shot showing the hydro relief valves on the tractor in the video.
      Screenshot_20210807-170609_YouTube.jpg
      The one closest to us seems to be taller with a flat top, where as both of mine look like the one furthest from us in the picture with the pin sticking up. The reason I ask and that it kind of sticks out is with the center cover on they have the bar that you're supposed to be able to move to open the valve/s to be able to free wheel it the lip attached to that bar doesn't look like it would ever hit anything on mine with the current setup. I'm wonder if someone replaced the valve with a different one at some point or I'm just missing something else with the way that is supposed to go in to open the valve/s?

      Thanks!

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by youngcuboldcub View Post
        Hi thanks for the information. In regard to the tires, the difference in them is the dish of the rim and where the valve stem is mounted. If I mounted them the way the factory wheels were the valve stem would face in and in turn hit the steering spindles.
        Ok, yes I see what you are saying. You found a set of narrow frame Cub Cadet wheel rims instead of wide frame ones. The dish is just opposite. Just repaint the old rims and use them, unless they are pitted badly.


        Originally posted by youngcuboldcub View Post
        As for the things to address, the short answer is yes everything will be normal, what you see is what it took to kind of toss together and be able to say it is running. We had discussed the coil in my original welcome post, I did find one with the correct resistance and was listed as a factory replacement, with that being said, it was just a little bigger diameter than the original coil and the screw to tighten the bracket around it wasn't quite long enough, so that is actually on my list to get a longer screw so I can secure it properly and get it mounted back up properly. That factory replacement coil certainly wasn't a factory replacement though as the original one had a male center pin and the one I received was a female. I did check the resistance however and it was within the proper range. When I do mount the coil back up properly I'm going to also reattach the factory choke bracket and have that all properly adjusted.
        Ok, so the replacement coil you got IS correct. The one you removed IS NOT an original. It was incorrect. The correct coil will have a female tower not a male tower. Good deal on planning to get it all on and bolted up correctly.


        Originally posted by youngcuboldcub View Post
        The spark plug wire is worthy of a paragraph in itself. I kind of feel like wire that was on it was the original wire based on the age and the fact it was a stranded copper core wire, however you stated the wire comes straight out of the coil and that one came out at a 90 with a boot. The original wire had failed inside the boot of of the spark plug end where it would lose continuity depending on how it was bent. Originally I was hoping I could source one from an auto parts store, but alas I lost faith when I went to my local store and showed them the spark plug wire and they needed me to remind them what it was called. I stopped at a local garage but run by a younger kid and my results weren't much better. The wire you saw in the picture was just a Frankenstein setup from an old auto wire that was "engineered" to fit that coil. Locally the best I found was at another auto parts store they did have a kit to make your own but I just don't feel like a red spark plug wire would color coordinate very well. You mentioned sourcing the wire from Kohler, since I have to pick up a few gaskets anyways I may just go that route assuming they don't think their wires are made of gold.
        I just have such a hard time comprehending that there simply isn't anyone left in the repair or parts industry that knows what a spark plug wire is and how to make one up. I mean, I totally believe you, but it just makes my head hurt so bad I don't want to think about it. A plug wire from Kohler will cost you about $40 I think. I think that ranks up there in the "gold" category. Stens has them for $18 on Amazon. O'Reilly auto parts can get single spark plug wires like you need for around $5 or you can order a universal set for a 4 cylinder motor for about the same price as the Stens wire on Amazon, but you can make at least 4 wires out of it. Really, I don't know why part store employees are so ignorant. Here is a link to all 42 results of single spark plug wires you can get from O'Reilly's.


        Originally posted by youngcuboldcub View Post
        Also while visiting my father and discussing the tractor, the topic of the volt meter instead of the ohm meter came up and it turns out he had an old ohm meter that looks to be the exact size that I need. While not IH branded it certainly has the look and age to it so it will serve the purpose until I perhaps decide to go the route of a full restoration.
        I think you're a bit confused on some terms here. An OHM meter measures OHM's, or resistance. It is a tool that is used in electrical diagnostics to find out the resistance of wires, or components. A volt meter is also a tool that can be combined together with an OHM meter. You are talking about a volt gauge or an amp gauge. The original gauge that all IH Cub Cadet tractors used was a amp gauge. A volt gauge simply reads system voltage and needs only have a power source (from the key) to give a reading. An amp gauge has to have voltage from the system ran through it to give its reading on the system. They have to be wired in very differently. I suggest, due to the vast difference in wiring of the two gauges, wiring it up as it was intended for an amp gauge. I would also suggest just going ahead and getting the correct IH gauge and be done with that part of the project. Here is just one company that you can purchase an IH amp gauge from. Steiner Tractor Parts would be another.


        Originally posted by youngcuboldcub View Post
        Finally while looking at a video on the lift installation I noticed something that I wanted to question, here is a shot showing the hydro relief valves on the tractor in the video.
        The one closest to us seems to be taller with a flat top, where as both of mine look like the one furthest from us in the picture with the pin sticking up. The reason I ask and that it kind of sticks out is with the center cover on they have the bar that you're supposed to be able to move to open the valve/s to be able to free wheel it the lip attached to that bar doesn't look like it would ever hit anything on mine with the current setup. I'm wonder if someone replaced the valve with a different one at some point or I'm just missing something else with the way that is supposed to go in to open the valve/s?
        There are two different check valves used on the Sundstrand Hydrostat transmissions. There are manual and automatic. They are interchangeable. The manual check valve has a button on top that can be depressed with the release lever on the tractor. The automatic type are taller and do not need to be manually released to make the tractor roll. Once fluid pressure is gone (engine off) they release on their own. You can buy rebuilt valves or have yours rebuilt from this supplier. He is one of few that rebuild them. He comes highly recommended in the garden tractor world.


        Overall, I want to say that you got really lucky finding such a good 169. As a mechanic I totally understand wanting to get it all running before doing a restore on it, but at the same time, if that is your plan, it takes a lot of time to do things twice. It is much simpler to just make repairs correctly as you go. Doing things twice wastes time and money. Example: installing a volt meter only to later have to rewire and install an ammeter. Just do it once and be done. I promise, the tractor can be repaired, and it is worth repairing. Even if the engine was toast, they can be rebuilt. The hydrostatic transmissions only fail if they were abused, usually by being towed too fast or too far when the machine was not running. That is about the only way they fail. Change the oil and filter on it, maybe even take the rear end out and clean it up, put in new gaskets and be happy. Don't take the hydro apart though unless you are prepared. It's not a part that you just disassemble for fun. Lot of parts inside that are matched sets and need to be kept together, also a hydro is a highly machined component. ANY dirt or debris that enters into them can cause a complete failure. They absolutely can be disassembled and repaired, but they and the work area needs to be almost surgically clean. It is actually much more critical that internal engine work. Machine tolerances are much tighter in a hydro than an engine. Just an FYI. But.... the check valves we were discussing earlier, they can be simply swapped out. Just wash the area around them thoroughly before removing them to be sure no dirt enters the hydro. All in all, I think you are well on your way to a really nice machine you will enjoy. Keep going!

        ~Jonathan
        Oblong, Illinois

        Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

        I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

        Comment

        Working...
        X