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    882 Diesel

    I`m considering buying an 882 diesel. How good are these? Are they expensive to keep up? collectible? Thanks! Jon

    #2
    Hello Jon!

    Any diesel machine is going to be more expensive to own and maintain. Just the nature of the beast. As far as how good of a machine an 882 is, it isn't bad. Truth be told, all the Cub Cadet diesels have some areas they are lacking in. The entire electrical system is one of the two main areas. The starter needed a larger battery, along with a second relay. The key switch itself had too much of a load on it, as it powered the large solenoid on the starter, and ALL the power for the glow plugs ran through it along with the charging system. What a load! The starter and glow plug systems can be retrofitted with a relay(s) that takes the load off the key switch, and also puts more power to each area respectively.

    Second area that was really weak was the driveline. The diesel tractors had the same driveline as the gas counterparts, and frankly it was barely good enough for those. The diesel engine simply pounds the driveline to death. It is an area that needs constant attention and periodic maintenance. There is good news though. The later Cyclops tractors went to a CV style driveshaft and it can be converted to work on the older machines. Our member JeffinPA makes adapters and conversion parts to update to the newer style driveline. He can be reached up top on the navigation bar "Parts by Jeff".

    Are the diesels "collectible"...... I suppose so. They are sought after. Mostly because people just think they "need" one, for whatever reason. A lot of guys find out very quickly that if you aren't very good at fixing things, or don't know anything about diesels the old wore out machines are too expensive to have and use. If you know how to work on a diesel, it sure helps. If you have access to a lot of tools, they aren't bad to repair. If you just piddle in the garage with Popular Mechanic tools from Wal-Mart, the diesel machines are probably not a machine for you. However, they aren't hard to sell, as guys are always looking to buy them. The older machines are the ones that are sought after as "collectibles". The 882 is getting there, but you don't see many at shows. Pretty much the red IH built 82 series is the stopping point at most shows. After the sale to MTD, the machines don't hold as much interest to collectors. IH tractors are more desirable.

    So.... here's the shortened version: They are expensive to maintain, but more expensive to fix up. You'll sink some money in one, especially if it doesn't run. Not trying to persuade you away, just want you to know what you are getting into. Don't think it won't need attention in all the expensive areas...... they always do. I just want you going into it knowing what you are getting into. Seen lots of guys throw up their hands waist deep in dollars and the project but don't know how, or can't afford to finish it out. If the engine is wore out, or even the fuel system, you are talking thousands to put it back together. I've rebuilt these engines and they run up towards $2000 by the time you go all through them. (Engine and fuel system.) Pump is around $800 and injectors in the $80-$120 range (each) depending who's rebuilding them. Engine parts are around $1200 for a major. Then there is head and valve work. BUT..... if it runs good, then you don't need to worry about all that. At least not right away.

    Good luck buying it and if you do POST PICTURES!
    ~Jonathan
    Oblong, Illinois

    Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

    I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

    Comment


      #3
      Jon makes some very good points, but there are a few things I'd like to add. Yes the little Kubota engine used in the 882 could be totally worn out or damaged from neglect, but in my experience and I've owned several, the diesel Cubs usually can be brought back to life. Sure, they will be more expensive than a gas tractor, but they do have a little better resale value. If the tractor you are looking at is complete and the engine turns over through a full 360 degree rotation, it could be a fun project if you can buy it cheaply enough. Here in NY, the 882 in the condition I just described, would bring in the area of $800 -$1000 if advertised. If it's a unrestored running tractor add $400 or so. Hope we've helped you with some information on the 882. As Jon mentioned, if you get it post some pictures. As for questions about repairs after a purchase, I'm sure we can help you with anything that could come up.

      Comment


        #4
        That's what I was thinking it could get expensive. The seller is asking 1500 on it with 980 hours, says " everything works". I haven't gone to see it in person yet its about 2hrs from where I live.

        Comment


          #5
          They are neat, especially when they are turbocharged correctly, but a diesel cub is like getting into tractor pulling, youu need lots of cash if your going to play the game. My opinion only! Best of luck, post pix!

          Comment


            #6
            Hey Guys,

            New to the forum and tractors in general. I have been looking for a little loader to do some yard work I am planning in the spring. I may end up just renting a walk behind bobcat for a few hundred a day, but I like to have stuff. So, I came upon an Cub Cadet 882 diesel online. The ad claims:
            This tractor is equipped with a Kwik Way front end loader, model 45-02510. The loader comes with the standard bucket and a manure bucket. Mower deck is also included. Machine works great. Looks a little rough, but performs great. Asking 2200 or best offer.

            tractor.jpg
            tractor2.jpg
            tractor3.jpg

            I was all set to run out and pick this up....then I stumbled upon this thread and now I worry that I may buy a headache . I am not a diesel person or a tractor person, but I am pretty handy around tools and do not worry about fixing things. The unit has 882 hours and I know that does not mean much...the condition may tell a better tale. Well, this condition looks rough...I know a little paint and some elbow grease could probably bring it back...so not fearful of that. The person that is selling thinks it is a 1987.

            So, at first glance, does $2200 seem reasonable, or is $1500 a reasonable price.

            I was gung-ho last night, now I may just be renting something in the spring. If this has promise I will take a chance. My spring project probably amounts to moving 20 or 30 yards of topsoil. Of course if I end up purchasing, I am sure I will find a million projects. Just don't want the primary project the immediate restoration. At some point that could happen. Of note, my property is a 1/3 of an acre, so I need to figure out some justification.

            TIA...Mike

            Comment


              #7
              IMHO the loader attachment and rear wheel weights are worth around $1000 - $1200 by themselves, making the cost of the diesel Cub around $1000, which is a pretty fair price for a running tractor if it were here in NY. $1800 would make me feel much more comfortable. Make an offer and negotiate!

              Comment


                #8
                Hello Mike and welcome to ECC!

                As far as the price goes, I'm with Stan, the price with the loader seems about right. You can see if he would take less, but at $2K it looks like a good price.

                That said, as a guy who has ran a lot of equipment, a Cub Cadet with a loader isn't much of anything at all. It beats a shovel, but that's about it. Here's what I see:

                * The rear tires are still just turf tires. They aren't going to get any traction to be able to scoop up a load. It does have wheel weights, but that still won't be enough weight to make it anywhere near stable. It NEEDS AG tires.
                * The front axle is still stock, and they simply were not heavy enough to be used for much of any loader work.
                * An 882 doesn't have power steering. You aren't going to like steering it with a bucket full of dirt.
                * ALL of the loaders made by other companies to go on a Cub Cadet tractor were made to fit all types of GT's, not a Cub specifically. Consequently, the bucket sticks out way too far in front of the machine, and the bucket itself is far too large to carry a load of dirt or rock. You can very quickly overload the tractor causing either the front axle to break, or it to tip over. If you are not an experienced tractor operator, this isn't the machine for you. Honestly, I don't really think inexperienced people need to operate a loader tractor, but that is my opinion. Too many things can go wrong quickly if you don't know what you are doing.

                Moving 20-30 yards of dirt is a lot. That's equal to about 10 wheeler load of dirt, which is quite a bit. If you need to move that much dirt, you are far better off renting a skid loader. Not a ride behind... or a ride on, like a Dingo. You should rent a small skid loader. They are much more stable, much safer and made to move dirt and rock. They are a construction machine. You say you have about 1/3 of an acre. Pretty hard in my mind to justify even a GT with a loader for so small a property. I live on 4 acres, have a garden that is about 1/10 of an acre and I have trouble justifying a loader tractor even in a GT size. Not that I couldn't use one... and hope to buy one someday. But for what you get, you will be MUCH happier with a sub-compact tractor. You would then have the choice of rear 3pt, rear PTO, live hydraulics, and a plethora of attachments that simply aren't available for a GT. I'm not trying to discourage a Cub Cadet purchase. Obviously, we all here own, use and LOVE our CC tractors! But for what you are doing, I don't think you will find it to suite your needs. If however, you are looking for a starting point, and may trade it later, then it may be for you. But you are going to have to do some things to that tractor to make it work better, and likely it will have some maintenance issues that need addressed. Good luck however you decide!
                ~Jonathan
                Oblong, Illinois

                Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

                I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

                Comment


                  #9
                  Hey Jonathan and Diesel Doc,

                  Thanks for your reply. I truly appreciate it. I talked to the guy last night and he was willing to go $1600 if I picked it up today. I was not ready so I let him know I had to think about it. The timing was centered around another person coming tomorrow. So, it may be a moot point now, but if the other person does not show it will be mine for $1600. Of course, I may not be running out to get it. I think the line I liked the most out of the replies was "it beats a shovel, but that's about it". I am not 100% my spring task will materialize....I would have much rather heard this loader setup is the bees knees, but I have a sense that is not the case.

                  Is there any other loader solution sub $2500?

                  I may need to refocus my efforts on a Wanderlodge....a whole other thing.

                  Thanks again for the honest feedback.

                  Thanks....Mike

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by hhcibtpaun View Post
                    Is there any other loader solution sub $2500?
                    Simple answer: No.
                    Nothing that isn't a mechanic special, or that will work in small areas. It is likely that you could find an old tractor and loader for less than $2500, but it will look like shit, and need a handful of cash to make it run and work well. Really, your best bet is to rent. I wasn't saying earlier not to buy the set up you are looking at. I'm just saying it isn't what you may have hoped it would be. It will be slow, need new tires, more weight, and even then it won't do even close to what you can do with a uniloader. But unless you get lucky, even an old Case 1816 or 1816B uniloader (skid loader) runs up around the $4000 mark.

                    The 882 CC with a loader would be decent if you have good weight, the loader bucket came to rest closer to the front of the tractor, and the bucket was about half the size it is. Other than the fact it will lift higher, I can do the same thing with my 185 Cub Lo-Boy and a 3pt dirt scoop and do it faster.
                    ~Jonathan
                    Oblong, Illinois

                    Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

                    I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

                    Comment

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