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    1864

    When to start my 1864, brake down, turn key nothing. Battery 13.4Volts. No lights on the dash. Try jumping from pos battery to starter selenoid nothing. check for ground, good ground everywhere. This tractor has a starter relay. Any ideas or suggestions will be appreciated. Thank you for your time.

    #2
    Originally posted by Ironman 62 View Post
    Try jumping from pos battery to starter selenoid nothing.
    When you say this ^^ where did you try jumping to? The signal wire on the solenoid on the engine? Direct to the starter? Where did you jump it? Depending on where you connected battery power to, it may or may not have done anything, which is totally normal and not an indication of the actual problem.

    Need to check to see if you are in fact getting 12V at the signal wire on the starter solenoid or not. That information will tell me a lot.
    ~Jonathan
    Oblong, Illinois

    Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

    I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by J-Mech View Post

      When you say this ^^ where did you try jumping to? The signal wire on the solenoid on the engine? Direct to the starter? Where did you jump it? Depending on where you connected battery power to, it may or may not have done anything, which is totally normal and not an indication of the actual problem.

      Need to check to see if you are in fact getting 12V at the signal wire on the starter solenoid or not. That information will tell me a lot.
      I have 12V on the big lug on the starter solenoid but nothing on the spade which I am assuming is the signal wire. Thank you for your time.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Ironman 62 View Post

        I have 12V on the big lug on the starter solenoid but nothing on the spade which I am assuming is the signal wire. Thank you for your time.
        The small spade you mention is indeed the wire that is used to engage the solenoid and subsequently the starter. It will only have 12V on it when the ignition switch (key) is in the "start" position.

        Battery power is supplied to the ignition switch. Once in the start position, power travels from the ignition switch to the brake switch. Assuming the pedal is depressed and the switch is good, power then goes to the PTO switch. If the PTO switch is in the "OFF" position and the switch is working as it should, power then travels to the small spade on the starter solenoid.

        Things to check:
        *Be sure the brake pedal is fully depressed and the lever on the brake pedal shaft is contacting the safety switch. The "paddle" on the brake shaft is known to break off.
        *Be sure the PTO switch is in the "OFF" position. People sometimes bump them, or kids get on the machine and move the switch. If not in the "OFF" position, the tractor will not attempt to start.

        Once you confirm these things, the next step would be to trace power from the ignition switch through the path described above. If you need a better description, or if you prefer a wiring diagram, you can download the service manual for your tractor here.

        Let us know if you need more help, or if you got it going.
        ~Jonathan
        Oblong, Illinois

        Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

        I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

        Comment


          #5
          Please remove this post if violates rules is inappropriate or just poor practice.

          On my 1863 and 1864 I have had problems not starting. The wiring connections were primarily the culprit. Until I cleaned every connection at the switches Jonathan mentioned, I would sometimes get a slight click or nothing or sometimes would crank to start. Eventually I installed a relay.

          What I did to use the tractor (prior to relay) was to turn the key to the on position then use a wire from the positive battery to the solenoid spade terminal. If you try this unsafe procedure, be sure the brake is latched on with working brakes. Remember this wire from the battery positive will cause sparks if it touches the engine. Just tap the wire to the spade terminal and be ready for the engine to crank. I used a alligator clip at the battery and just a stub of bare wire at the spade terminal

          Comment


            #6
            [QUOTE=Ironman 62;n13000][QUOTE=J-Mech;n12995]

            The small spade you mention is indeed the wire that is used to engage the solenoid and subsequently the starter. It will only have 12V on it when the ignition switch (key) is in the "start" position.

            Battery power is supplied to the ignition switch. Once in the start position, power travels from the ignition switch to the brake switch. Assuming the pedal is depressed and the switch is good, power then goes to the PTO switch. If the PTO switch is in the "OFF" position and the switch is working as it should, power then travels to the small spade on the starter solenoid.

            Things to check:
            *Be sure the brake pedal is fully depressed and the lever on the brake pedal shaft is contacting the safety switch. The "paddle" on the brake shaft is known to break off.
            *Be sure the PTO switch is in the "OFF" position. People sometimes bump them, or kids get on the machine and move the switch. If not in the "OFF" position, the tractor will not attempt to start.

            Once you confirm these things, the next step would be to trace power from the ignition switch through the path described above. If you need a better description, or if you prefer a wiring diagram, you can download the service manual for your tractor here.

            Let us know if you need more help, or if you got it going.
            Thank you for your help. After going thru the checks you described, I had no power to the battery terminal on the ignition switch. I ran a jumper from the battery pos to the battery terminal on the ignition switch[, turned the key to start and it started right up. If I remove the jumper from the battery pos, the engine will die. I still do not know what the original problem is, but at least it will start and run. Again I really appreciated your help.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by bugeye View Post
              Please remove this post if violates rules is inappropriate or just poor practice.

              On my 1863 and 1864 I have had problems not starting. The wiring connections were primarily the culprit. Until I cleaned every connection at the switches Jonathan mentioned, I would sometimes get a slight click or nothing or sometimes would crank to start. Eventually I installed a relay.

              What I did to use the tractor (prior to relay) was to turn the key to the on position then use a wire from the positive battery to the solenoid spade terminal. If you try this unsafe procedure, be sure the brake is latched on with working brakes. Remember this wire from the battery positive will cause sparks if it touches the engine. Just tap the wire to the spade terminal and be ready for the engine to crank. I used a alligator clip at the battery and just a stub of bare wire at the spade terminal
              Thank you for your reply.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Ironman 62 View Post
                Thank you for your help. After going thru the checks you described, I had no power to the battery terminal on the ignition switch. I ran a jumper from the battery pos to the battery terminal on the ignition switch[, turned the key to start and it started right up. If I remove the jumper from the battery pos, the engine will die. I still do not know what the original problem is, but at least it will start and run. Again I really appreciated your help.
                I'm sorry for not thinking simple enough.
                The positive battery post on the ignition switch is fed via a fuse. Did you check to see if the fuse is blown? It's near the battery. It's probably just a blown fuse.
                ~Jonathan
                Oblong, Illinois

                Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

                I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by J-Mech View Post

                  I'm sorry for not thinking simple enough.
                  The positive battery post on the ignition switch is fed via a fuse. Did you check to see if the fuse is blown? It's near the battery. It's probably just a blown fuse.
                  You were right blown 30 amp fuse, but what I do not understand is I checked that fuse when this all started and it was okay. The question I keep having to hit quote to reply. What is the normal procedure to reply>

                  Comment


                  • J-Mech
                    J-Mech commented
                    Editing a comment
                    This is an example of a comment. (See below post to understand.)

                  #10
                  Originally posted by Ironman 62 View Post
                  You were right blown 30 amp fuse, but what I do not understand is I checked that fuse when this all started and it was okay.
                  Well, great! Glad to find out that was an easy fix. Why it wasn't blown originally, I can only make some assumptions. Either way, at least you found it!


                  Originally posted by Ironman 62 View Post
                  The question I keep having to hit quote to reply. What is the normal procedure to reply?
                  There are at three ways to reply in a thread. Which one you choose is entirely up to you. You can either just scroll down to the bottom and type in a new message. You can use the quote feature to address a specific person, or question. Now, in this post here, I did some copy/pasting and quoted you twice, but no need to be that fancy. Just tricks I learned how to do over the years on forums. The third way to reply would be to use the "comment" feature (right beside the "quote" button). This allows you to make a post just below the one you are making a comment on. It's a great feature that can be used to have a small public side conversation, or to address a certain post in an "aside" within the thread. I don't suggest using it often, or in a thread such as this one, as the back and fourth between you and I (here) is what makes this thread a good thread. When bugeye jumped in, it made it better, as now the conversation had three people in it. I use the comment feature kind of like the name of it implies... to make a comment as an aside within the thread topic. So..... simply come down and make a post, or quote the one you are talking with it doesn't matter. Just as an FYI, you can also us the "@" symbol followed directly with a members screen name to address them. They will be notified that they were mentioned in a thread and know to respond. As an example, I will call on you: Ironman 62



                  Hope this helps!
                  ~Jonathan
                  Oblong, Illinois

                  Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

                  I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

                  Comment


                    #11
                    J-Mech, Thank you for your explanation, it did the trick. On my1864 I'm having trouble with the speed control . I can set it at my mowing speed and all of a sudden it will take off like a jackrabbit or it slows down to darn near stopping. I am constantly using the hydro lever to control the speed. I have changed the trans filter and install a new hy-tran. Any thoughts/ideas on what may be the problem will be greatly appreciated.

                    Comment


                      #12
                      Speed will change as load on the hydro changes, normal.

                      But, the input to the hydro may be changing. On the left side of the dash behind the black plastic is an adjustment nut which tightens against the friction washer. Remove left side engine panel. Slide an open end wrench behind the black plastic at the dash support. The purpose of the washer is to provide friction drag to the movement of the hydro lever. Over the years of use the linkage also loosens. Look at the joints for wear and where attached to the hydro. Look at springs within the bracket on the hydro. Broken or missing springs and/or worn bracket. (Too early to remember the name)

                      Comment

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