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    Getting Loaded

    20181118_153852.jpg20181118_152848.jpg


    Decided that I would try my hand at loading tires. Took the tires off the back of my Inlaws 1864 and broke a portion of the bead. Then removed the standard valve stem, installed the bolt on type, and then poured the washer fluid into the tires using a funnel. I know i put too much in, 8 gallon per tire to be exact, but laying on the floor the fluid doesn't occlude the valve stem. I also purchased a couple fluid type tire gauges. Threw one on the scale and WOW!!! 90 lbs. Not too bad for 50.00 and a little time!

    #2
    Yup, same procedure I used filling mine. I know it made a world of difference in the traction. And you can't beat the cost either...
    They can't all be turn key.
    Make the best of each and every day.
    Todd
    Original's Start to Finish vid. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GAoUNNiLwKs

    Comment


      #3
      If you fill them full of water you don't have to worry about putting air in.
      Tim - It's easier to ask for forgiveness than permission.
      Indiana, PA
      Check out my Youtube channel -

      https://www.youtube.com/user/xOLDS45512x

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by zippy1 View Post
        Yup, same procedure I used filling mine. I know it made a world of difference in the traction. And you can't beat the cost either...
        must be where I saw it! I'm kinda wanting to buy a pallet of the stuff now!! Like you say, great weight for the price!

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by olds45512 View Post
          If you fill them full of water you don't have to worry about putting air in.
          Crossed my mind. Wouldn't have to worry about flats either... till spring

          Comment


            #6
            Yeah, you only want to fill a tire about 3/4 full. I think a 23X10.50-12 is supposed to get like 6 gallons.

            Mine are 3/4 full of CaCl2 and they weigh right at 100# IIRC.
            ~Jonathan
            Oblong, Illinois

            Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

            I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by J-Mech View Post
              Yeah, you only want to fill a tire about 3/4 full. I think a 23X10.50-12 is supposed to get like 6 gallons.

              Mine are 3/4 full of CaCl2 and they weigh right at 100# IIRC.
              I kinda remember you saying that on occ, but what is the reason?

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Rescue11 View Post

                I kinda remember you saying that on occ, but what is the reason?
                If the tires are to full there is no air cushion to absorb shock, if you hit a big enough bump it can pop the tire. Also you want it low enough that you can put air in with the valve in the 12 position, once the tires are on put a jack under the tractor and turn the valve to 12 and pull the guts out and let it drain.
                Tim - It's easier to ask for forgiveness than permission.
                Indiana, PA
                Check out my Youtube channel -

                https://www.youtube.com/user/xOLDS45512x

                Comment


                • J-Mech
                  J-Mech commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Nailed it!

                • Leadslingingdaddy
                  Leadslingingdaddy commented
                  Editing a comment
                  What he said x2!

                #9
                Oh crap. Ok. I'll do that. Thanks guys. Probably wouldn't have had to buy so much!

                Comment


                  #10
                  Collect what you drain off and use it in your car's windshield washer tank!

                  Comment


                  • Rescue11
                    Rescue11 commented
                    Editing a comment
                    I have other tractors to put it in!

                  #11
                  I run about 9-12psi after filling...
                  Randy
                  Frederick MD

                  Gotta kill it before ya can grill it.... TN

                  Comment


                  • Rescue11
                    Rescue11 commented
                    Editing a comment
                    I put 10in! Loli

                  #12
                  I need to do this to my 73. It would make a world of difference in the snow. But I'm afraid the tires might not survive the bead braking process as they are the original ones. Dont know unless you try right?
                  Cory.



                  One piece at a time...

                  Comment


                    #13
                    Cory, I would tube them....
                    ~Jonathan
                    Oblong, Illinois

                    Just because it's old, doesn't mean it's obsolete!

                    I've got a lot of Cubs in the barn....but I have more implements/attachments!

                    Comment


                      #14
                      I got the 18 from keith last night and did as advised from those above! Thank you for that! I drained a smidge over a half gallon from each tire, then aired to 12 psig. So... 7.5 gallon in each tire. Guessing from what the tires weighed with 8 gallon at 90 lbs, they probably weigh around 85ish maybe a little more lbs.

                      Comment


                        #15
                        We load all of ours,, even for cutting grass.. it makes a huge difference in traction even just changing directions and turning around.. But around here we get by with plain old water.. very little freezing weather in South GA!

                        Comment


                        • J-Mech
                          J-Mech commented
                          Editing a comment
                          You ought to at least add a rust inhibitor. Wonder what the inside of the rims look like after a few years?

                        • jaynjeep
                          jaynjeep commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Yeah Jon I had often worried about the plain water against the rims.... but we had the tires off of moms 1450 last year.. it's had Carlisle ag's with water since about 1978.. Rims to by disbelief still look great.. little to no rust.. But we do keep them about 80 percent full of water and only 8 to 10 psi of air so I guess the rim never really comes in contact with the air.. maybe just the very top but it doesn't ever stay parked long.. Do they make a rust inhibitor that can be added to the fluid?

                        • J-Mech
                          J-Mech commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Well, that's good to know. That they weren't rusted bad. You are correct, that as long as the rim isn't exposed to air, it shouldn't rust. Not much anyway.

                          Yes, you can get rust inhibitors you can add to water. Here is an example: https://www.amazon.com/Boiler-Rust-I.../dp/B006KEC4DG
                          Again.... just an example. That's pretty concentrated. I'm sure you can find cheaper. I just did a 5 second search and that was one of the hits. IIRC, Prestolite makes a rust inhibitor for automotive cooling systems. To be used in addition to the coolant. Pretty cheap.
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